Other areas of disagreement between the Eastern Orthodox and Catholics concern marriage discipline..  Lack of space requires brevity on this point. Our traditions are different concerning what constitutes a marriage.

Other areas of disagreement between the Eastern Orthodox and Catholics concern marriage discipline..  Lack of space requires brevity on this point. Our traditions are different concerning what constitutes a marriage. Beyond this,

The Catholic Church believes that a sacramental marriage that has been consummated can be dissolved only by death, whereas while the Eastern Orthodox recognise indissolubility as a characteristic of marriage and an ideal at which to aim, they generally accept that divorce-and-remarriage can occur. Eastern Orthodox acceptance of divorce is linked to the historical subordination of the Church to the emperor in the Byzantine Empire.It was Emperor Justinian II who reintroduced divorce to the Byzantine Empire around the year 700, and because of the close links between the Patriarchate of Constantinople and the empire, this novelty was slowly permitted in the east.

Nevertheless, it is hard to find a common answer for the Eastern Orthodox on the doctrine of marriage, and there are certainly many opponents of divorce among them.

Purgatory is another topic of disagreement. While the Eastern Orthodox pray for the faithful departed and thus accept their being in a situation requiring our intercession, the doctrine of purgatory has not been as clearly developed in the east as it has in the west.

In addition, most Eastern Orthodox do not accept the Immaculate Conception as it has been defined in the west . While highly venerating the Blessed Virgin Mary, they see her as the goal and fulfilment of salvation history. The Eastern Orthodox do not believe in “original sin” as it was conceived by St. Augustine of Hippo and received by the Church in the west. Rather, they have a notion of “ancestral sin.” Because the belief in inherited original sin and guilt is rejected, this means that the Eastern Orthodox regard the doctrine as developed in the west as unnecessary.

Since the seven ecumenical councils that are recognised by both the Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches, the Catholic Church has held 14 more councils which it regards as ecumenical. The Eastern Orthodox have held several councils since the Second Council of Nicaea in 787, but none of these are (universally) recognised as having been ecumenical. Rather, there have been local councils, and letters from individual bishops. The most recent is the  recent pan-Orthodox Council k – though four of the 14 autocephalous Orthodox Churches declined to participate.

Other issues on which the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Churches  disagree are the date of Easter; the use of unleavened bread for the Eucharist; the portrayal of Christ as a lamb; and the ordination of married men.

Many of the things I have mentioned may appear trivial but the differences have occurred and as with so many things with the passage of time become more difficult to resolve. The disagreements concerning marriage discipline purgatory and the Immaculate Conception are an example of what happens when Eastern and Western Theological and philosophical disciplines become separated. None the less we understand that the greatest ecclesial disaster which occurred in the history of the Church is the separation from full Communion of the East from the West. It is a great sign og Gods providence that very great progress has been made in the dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Churches,

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